Modern Languages in the News

Matthew Reisz (Times Higher) and Kate Adie (BBC) have added their voices to the debate about the state of Modern Languages in the UK.

Matthew Reisz summarises the arguments put forward during a conference/debate on The Future of UK Modern Languages (co-organised by the MHRA and IGRS). I attended the conference, held on 17 June 2011 at Senate House, University of London. It brought together academics, employers, journalists and politicians to debate why Modern Languages are so essential to the UK economy (both cultural economy and financial economy).

Kate Adie talks about the difficulty of motivating teenagers to study Modern Languages, warning that TV, pop music and the internet seem to contribute to a ‘why bother?’ attitude. But adopting such an attitude means they miss out on so much… (and recent episodes of The Apprentice confirm this…)

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One response to “Modern Languages in the News

  1. Stephen Bishop

    It was interesting in those reports to see the moan-to-positive ratio. Moans dominate, as one would expect. But given that there isn’t a magic wand which will restore things to the former budgets, and given that trying to do the same with less resources is also doomed, the only real choice is to work out new ways to achieve whatever it is that needs to be achieved. Which means, first of all working out what needs to be achieved. By getting into that mindset academics and their institutions won’t make the bad stuff go away, but they will have a real chance to create something new which, arguably, is one of the things that academics should be doing.

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